New Humanist

Category: Faces of Nonviolence

Jainism

“To feel compassion for a Living being is to feel compassion for one’s self.” Jainism, together with Hinduism and Buddhism, is one of India’s religions. In Jainism, each living being contains a unique and immortal vital principle. Each act is itself a cause which produces an effect and, therefore, each violent action (himsa) against this…

M. K. Gandhi

“Non violence is the greatest power available to humanity.” Gandhi was born in India in 1869 He moved to London in 1888 to get his law degree. His interests brought him to study religious texts. He discovered Tolstoy’s thought and was especially struck by The Reign of God Is Within You, which he defined as…

Leo. Tolstoy

“Do not do unto others what you would not have done to you.” Tolstoy was born in 1828 at Jasnaja Poljana in Russia. Between 1860 and 1880 he wrote his two most famous novels, War and Peace and Anna Karenina. But it is in his other books, such as “The Kingdom of God is Inside…

Betty Williams and Mairead Corrigan

(Ireland del Norte) (1943-) (1944-) “The only force that can break the barriers is the force of love, the force of truth, the force of the soul….” Betty Williams was baptized Catholic, but born in a family that practiced different religions. Her maternal grandparents were Jewish and Catholic, her paternal grandparents were Protestants. Her maternal…

Mario Luis Rodriguez Cobos (Silo)

(1938 – 2010) “Love the reality that you built and not even death will stop your flight”. Rodriguez Cobos was an Argentinean writer and thinker, founder of the Universalist Humanism and Honorius doctor by the Science Academy of Russia. The initial attempts to publish his ideas were stopped by the cruel military regime in Argentina…

Martin Luther King, Jr.

(January 15, 1929 – April 4, 1968) He was an American clergyman, activist, and prominent leader in the African-American Civil Rights Movement.[1] He is best known for being an iconic figure in the advancement of civil rights in the United States and around the world, using nonviolent methods following the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi.[2] King…

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks

(February 4, 1913 – October 24, 2005) was an African-American civil rights activist, whom the U.S. Congress called “the first lady of civil rights”, and “the mother of the freedom movement”. On December 1, 1955 in Montgomery, Alabama, Parks refused to obey bus driver James Blake’s order that she give up her seat to make…